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09
15

Violent protests in Sydney and London. Actual non-photoshopped pictures of kids holding signs that say ‘Behead those who insult the prophet’. So I guess these are more examples of the media claiming Muslims are touchy about the film when in fact the real reason for the protests are frustration and anger with US foreign policy.

I don’t know if some of you are in denial or just plain stupid - but there are actual protests going on over this film, there have been people killed over this film, and these are groups of Muslims who have clashed with police and destroyed buildings and set fires to American establishments. These protests are not just happening in countries where American bombs are being dropped.

You have run out of excuses and there is no justification you can pull out of your ass now. This is not a Zionist media conspiracy or puppeteer politicians at work. This was a completely grassroots protest, sparked by and populated by Muslims in an Australian city, that turned violent. Enough of your bullshit.

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06

zikrayat:

I can’t believe that the Joplin mosque was burned to the ground. Some prayer rugs didn’t just get burned, we didn’t lose a few Qur’ans. The whole masjid was razed. 

Someone came to the Joplin mosque last night at 3:30 am with the intention of wiping it off the map. The loss would be felt even if this was an accident, but we know that the pain is magnified under these hateful and bigoted conditions. During our most holy month, the Islamic community of America has lost a place to pray and a place of peace. But what these arsonists don’t understand is that the real mosques and the foundations of Islam are not in mortar or brick, but wherever the believers are. The foundation of Islam is in over one billion people in this world, in every state, country and language. You might be able to get rid of a mosque, but you can’t get rid of Islam.

 ”But since we are people of faith we just can remember that this is a thing that happened because God let it happen, and we have to be patient, particularly in the month of Ramadan, control our emotions, our anger.” - Imam Lahmuddin of the Joplin Mosque

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"When I started college, my mom told me: ‘You’re there to study, if I catch you talking to a girl, I will break your neck.’ By the time I graduated, my mom told me: ‘Why haven’t you found any good girls to marry? You’re so old!’"

- Wajahat Ali quotes comedian/journalist Aman Ali (above) in his piece about sex and American Muslims (via guardiancomment)

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popmuslim:

March 3 - The ultra-conservative International Football Association Board (IFAB), comprising FIFA and the four British Home Associations, rarely if ever reverses its decisions but made an exception here today by unanimously agreeing to lift the ban on the Islamic headscarf being worn by female footballers, pending health and safety checks. Muslim women will therefore be cleared to wear the headscarf in international football from July following the historic decision taken at the IFAB’s annual meeting, held at an exclusive hotel and spa complex in Surrey, England.FIFA’s youngest and most progressive Executive Committee member Prince Ali Bin Al Hussein of Jordan had led the campaign to overturn the ban on the hijab on safety grounds and gave a persuasive demonstration on revolutionary non-zipped Velcro-designed headscarves that were deemed 100 per cent safe.Prince Ali is understood to have received significant backing from English Football Association chairman David Bernstein, who chaired the meeting, to make sure the issue received a full airing.

popmuslim:

March 3 - The ultra-conservative International Football Association Board (IFAB), comprising FIFA and the four British Home Associations, rarely if ever reverses its decisions but made an exception here today by unanimously agreeing to lift the ban on the Islamic headscarf being worn by female footballers, pending health and safety checks.

Muslim women will therefore be cleared to wear the headscarf in international football from July following the historic decision taken at the IFAB’s annual meeting, held at an exclusive hotel and spa complex in Surrey, England.

FIFA’s youngest and most progressive Executive Committee member Prince Ali Bin Al Hussein of Jordan had led the campaign to overturn the ban on the hijab on safety grounds and gave a persuasive demonstration on revolutionary non-zipped Velcro-designed headscarves that were deemed 100 per cent safe.

Prince Ali is understood to have received significant backing from English Football Association chairman David Bernstein, who chaired the meeting, to make sure the issue received a full airing.

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amal-leila:

This artwork by Shirin Neshat.
Iranian artist Shirin Neshat addresses the role of women in Islamic society through compelling photo and video work. Her early work consisted of photos of veil-covered women in extremely compromised or uncomfortable positions with writing across their hands or faces. Her more recent work deals primarily with the transition between art and cinema, allowing for a narrative to create particular characters. By basing her video on the novel “Women without Men” by Shahrnush Parsipur, the videos allow the narrative to portray themes of refuge and identity.

amal-leila:

This artwork by Shirin Neshat.

Iranian artist Shirin Neshat addresses the role of women in Islamic society through compelling photo and video work. Her early work consisted of photos of veil-covered women in extremely compromised or uncomfortable positions with writing across their hands or faces. Her more recent work deals primarily with the transition between art and cinema, allowing for a narrative to create particular characters. By basing her video on the novel “Women without Men” by Shahrnush Parsipur, the videos allow the narrative to portray themes of refuge and identity.

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02
23

"Despite being an ex-Muslim, i.e. someone who learned so much about Islam that she was appalled enough to leave it, I’ve been accused of being an apologist for Islam."

-

Biggest GPOY of all time

"Why are you an ex-Muslim?"

"Because I was a Muslim."

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02
23

"It shocked me, when I was an American Muslim, that so many mosques in England lack a prayer section for women. This is changing, but it was quite the culture shock to go from American mosques, where women almost always have a section and often serve in mosque leadership, to a country where there wasn’t even a place for me to pray. My British cousin explained to me that having women at the mosque “caused fitna” because men ended up fighting over the women. I replied by wryly asking her why they didn’t ban the men instead."

- The Myth of the Muslim Monolith | Heina Dadabhoy

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muslimwomeninhistory:
Saving faces in Pakistan 
When he learned that there  are 150 acid attacks a year in Pakistan, plastic surgeon Mohammad Jawad  went there to help repair the damage done to the victims. Now he is the  subject of an Oscar-nominated film.
Read More

muslimwomeninhistory:

Saving faces in Pakistan 

When he learned that there are 150 acid attacks a year in Pakistan, plastic surgeon Mohammad Jawad went there to help repair the damage done to the victims. Now he is the subject of an Oscar-nominated film.

Read More

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02
10
thedailywhat:

Hamza Kashgari, a young writer for the Saudi daily newspaper Al Bilad who fled his homeland after being charged with offending Islam and the Prophet Mohammed, was seized upon arrival in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and will be sent back to Saudi Arabia to face a possible death sentence.
Kashgari took to Twitter last week, prior to the anniversary of Muhammad’s birth, and wrote down a series of seemingly innocuous reflections.
“On your birthday, I find you wherever I turn. I will say that I have loved aspects of you, hated others, and could not understand many more,” the 23-year-old tweeted.
The response from tens of thousands of Saudis was immediate and unequivocal: Kashgari was a blasphemer and deserved to die.
He attempted to withdraw his comments and apologize — even beg — but the damage had been done. A short while later, King Abdullah personally ordered his arrest, and Kashgari became a fugitive.
He managed to escape Saudi Arabia, but didn’t get very far. “The Malaysian authorities are coordinating with Saudi Arabia to hand Kashgari over,” the Saudi newspaper Al Youm reported.
The country’s powerful Islamic Fatwa Committee has released a statement saying Kashgari must be punished in accordance with Islamic law. In other words: Execution. 
[emirates247 / dailybeast.]

thedailywhat:

Hamza Kashgari, a young writer for the Saudi daily newspaper Al Bilad who fled his homeland after being charged with offending Islam and the Prophet Mohammed, was seized upon arrival in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and will be sent back to Saudi Arabia to face a possible death sentence.

Kashgari took to Twitter last week, prior to the anniversary of Muhammad’s birth, and wrote down a series of seemingly innocuous reflections.

“On your birthday, I find you wherever I turn. I will say that I have loved aspects of you, hated others, and could not understand many more,” the 23-year-old tweeted.

The response from tens of thousands of Saudis was immediate and unequivocal: Kashgari was a blasphemer and deserved to die.

He attempted to withdraw his comments and apologize — even beg — but the damage had been done. A short while later, King Abdullah personally ordered his arrest, and Kashgari became a fugitive.

He managed to escape Saudi Arabia, but didn’t get very far. “The Malaysian authorities are coordinating with Saudi Arabia to hand Kashgari over,” the Saudi newspaper Al Youm reported.

The country’s powerful Islamic Fatwa Committee has released a statement saying Kashgari must be punished in accordance with Islamic law. In other words: Execution. 

[emirates247 / dailybeast.]

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radicalqueery:

What is life like for the transgender community in the world’s largest Muslim country, Indonesia? In this eye-opening documentary, shot in the scenic coastal region of South Sulawesi, we follow the lives of four waria (from the words wanita, meaning woman, and pria, meaning man): female in outward appearance, but actually biological men who believe they were born with a woman’s soul, and who are not interested in a sex change because of Islam’s teachings. TALES OF THE WARIA interweaves the stories of these waria, who encounter unique obstacles in their search for love. Suharni’s seemingly perfect relationship with her boyfriend is tested when she leaves town to find work. Mami Ria, a waria elder, struggles to revive her 18-year relationship with a police officer. Former waria Firman leads a quiet life with his wife and two kids, but still dreams of the past when he had long hair and danced with men. Guiding us through these stories is Tiara, a glamorous entertainer who secretly harbors her own heartache. What happens in the complex lives of these four brave individuals? Can they realize their dreams for a future with their male partners? Taking us to nightclubs, salons, and into the characters’ homes and hearts, this compelling documentary insightfully expands our knowledge of topics rarely discussed in depth in Western media: Indonesia, Islamic culture, and the daily life and struggles of transgender communities around the world.
http://www.facebook.com/thewaria

radicalqueery:

What is life like for the transgender community in the world’s largest Muslim country, Indonesia? In this eye-opening documentary, shot in the scenic coastal region of South Sulawesi, we follow the lives of four waria (from the words wanita, meaning woman, and pria, meaning man): female in outward appearance, but actually biological men who believe they were born with a woman’s soul, and who are not interested in a sex change because of Islam’s teachings. TALES OF THE WARIA interweaves the stories of these waria, who encounter unique obstacles in their search for love. Suharni’s seemingly perfect relationship with her boyfriend is tested when she leaves town to find work. Mami Ria, a waria elder, struggles to revive her 18-year relationship with a police officer. Former waria Firman leads a quiet life with his wife and two kids, but still dreams of the past when he had long hair and danced with men. Guiding us through these stories is Tiara, a glamorous entertainer who secretly harbors her own heartache. What happens in the complex lives of these four brave individuals? Can they realize their dreams for a future with their male partners? Taking us to nightclubs, salons, and into the characters’ homes and hearts, this compelling documentary insightfully expands our knowledge of topics rarely discussed in depth in Western media: Indonesia, Islamic culture, and the daily life and struggles of transgender communities around the world.

http://www.facebook.com/thewaria

(Source: transqueery)

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artsofislam:

Interior dome tile work in the Imam’s Mosque, formerly the Shah’s Mosque (Masjed-i Shah) before the 1979 Revolution, in Naqsh-i Jahan Square, Isfahan. Built 1611-1629 by Shah Abbas I.

(Source: foxpass)

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latimes:

For Muslims celebrating Christmas, it’s a holiday, not a holy day: At a time when Christmas is being pulled in different directions, it’s not unusual for Muslims to use the occasion as an entry into American culture — no different from signing up their kids for Little League. But most clerics frown on the practice.
Photo:  Sahira Traband, here with her sons Teo, 10, left, and Mikail, 6, is a Muslim who decorates her house for Christmas, hangs stockings and puts gifts under the tree. She views the holiday as a happy time that doesn’t conflict with her faith in Islam. “The magic of Christmas is the part we celebrate,” said Traband, 45. “We didn’t get into the whole religious thing.” Credit: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

For Muslims celebrating Christmas, it’s a holiday, not a holy day: At a time when Christmas is being pulled in different directions, it’s not unusual for Muslims to use the occasion as an entry into American culture — no different from signing up their kids for Little League. But most clerics frown on the practice.

Photo: Sahira Traband, here with her sons Teo, 10, left, and Mikail, 6, is a Muslim who decorates her house for Christmas, hangs stockings and puts gifts under the tree. She views the holiday as a happy time that doesn’t conflict with her faith in Islam. “The magic of Christmas is the part we celebrate,” said Traband, 45. “We didn’t get into the whole religious thing.” Credit: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

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